Data Dilemma MMOWGLI Game Awards

150413-N-LV331-002 NAPLES, Italy (April 13, 2015) Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus delivers remarks during an all-hands call at Naval Support Activity Naples. Mabus is visiting the region as part of a multi-nation trip to the U.S. Pacific and European command areas of responsibility to meet with military and civilian leaders and Sailors and Marines. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Armando Gonzales/Released)

Data Dilemma MMOWGLI Game Awards

Dear Data Dilemma Players,

Thank you for your high-energy participation in the Data Dilemma MMOWGLI game!  The dd game reports are intensely valuable. As is customary with every MMOWGLI, we want to recognize those who contributed in ways that stood out most to the sponsors and the game team. We are truly impressed with all the Idea Cards and Action Plans contributed. Several players merit special recognition. Deciding on the top winners was difficult, but after much deliberation the following awards have been chosen.  Drum roll please:

Total Points Awards

Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Letter of Appreciation (LOA), and the Legion de MMOWGLI  Medal (LDM), is awarded to the players with the top 3 total score points.

1. Rodent.  Affiliation: U.S. Navy.  Expertise: Big Data ISR Experience.  Location: SPAWAR HQ, San Diego California.

2. NG36B.  Affiliation: U.S. Navy.  Expertise: submarines, targeting, SIGINT, blogging.  Location: Hawaii.

3. K1rskterAffiliation: Public Ex-Navy in CO.  Expertise: CTO, Data Architect, technologist, thinker.

Letter of Appreciation (LOA) from the Department of the Navy (DON) Chief for Strategy & Innovation, and the MMOWGLI Commendation Medal (MCM), are awarded to the players with the top 4-6 total score points.

 
MMOWGLI Commendation Medal Winners

4. Frost M1-SW.  Affiliation: U.S. Government NCCC FEMA CORPS.  Expertise: Public administration and Political science majors / Builds computers.  Location: Denver.

5. Arch.                Affiliation: U.S. Government.  Expertise: Metrics, Database development, Modeling and Simulation Development, Robotics, Data Policy.

6. Desert Fox.      Affiliation: U.S. Air Force.  Expertise: IT Management.


 

Idea Card Play Awards

Longest Idea Card Chains

NG36B for card 2311If I break your connection to the cloud, do you lose the battle because you can't think on your own?

All About The Data for card 46Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is an IT policy that allows people to utilize their own cell phones and tablets at work.

Super Hero: Most Super-Interesting Cards Played

Rodent with 80 idea cards
 

Telling It Like It Is: Best Anonymous Videos

NG36B with an astonishing 11 videos
 


Bandwagon Fan: Most Expand Cards Played

Expand Card Rodent with 160 idea cards
 

Overcomer: Most Adapt Cards Played

Adapt Card Rodent with 103 idea cards
 

Devil's Advocate: Most Counter Cards Played

Counter Card NG36B with 84 idea cards
 

Trailblazer: Most Explore Cards Played

Explore Card Rodent with 106 idea cards
 

Best Supporting Actor: Most Action Plan Comments

Rodent with 93 post-plan comments
 
 

Action Plan Awards

More tough choices... the Action Plans that the design team chose are both about data automation. Data automation provides big opportunities for the DON to effectively use the ever increasing data in today's fiscally constrained environment and is a topic that our office wants to explore in more detail. We will contact all of the winners to join a virtual round-table meeting, discuss potential data automation pilots with the DON Chief of Strategy & Innovation.

Bravo Zulu to All Hands

150427-N-NM917-018 ZHANJIANG, People's Republic of China (April 22, 2015) Cdr. Nathan Fugate, executive officer aboard the U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), plans a search and rescue exercise with service members of the People's Liberation Army (Navy) of China. Blue Ridge is conducting a port visit to Zhanjiang to build naval partnerships with China's South Sea Fleet to ensure peace and prosperity for the entire region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Samuel Weldin/ Released)

We recommend that everyone read all of the Action Plans, especially including the comments by other players - totally interesting.   All game products are published online and (here's one more three-letter acronym for you) an After-Action Report (AAR) is being produced to capture the full story accomplished by each of you in the Data Dilemma game.  We will publish this report publicly when complete.

BZ and congratulations to our deserving winners, a hearty Oh Wow! as we contemplate the results, and most importantly Thank You once again to all players.  We think that your thoughtful contributions and diligent efforts will trigger some far-reaching effects to help the U.S. Navy.

Play the game, change the game!

Sincerely yours, the dd Data Dilemma MMOWGLI design team

 

Data Dilemma Game Play Complete

Return to port!Data Dilemma Game Play Complete!

Congratulations all players.  Results from the Data Dilemma game are impressive!

The online reports show

  •   250 Players contributing during 15 days of thoughtful innovation.
  • 2683 Idea Cards examining a total variety of issues and answers.
  •  21 Action Plans proposing new paths forward to achieve a data-centric Navy.

You've given the game team a lot to think about.  Stay tuned as we work on results and awards, we're planning an announcement within the week.

As ever: play the game, change the game!


Photo credit: 150225-N-DB801-292 PEARL HARBOR (Feb. 25, 2015) The family of Master Chief Electronics Technician Mark Wolfe, assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717), cheer for his arrival at the submarine piers at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a six-month deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steven Khor/Released)

One More Day To Go

One More Day To Go!

This is everyone's last chance to review, vote and comment on Action Plans in the dd Data Dilemma game.

(Sept. 15, 2014) Tugboats assigned to Naval Station Newport assist the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), homeported in Norfolk, Va., as she prepares to moor pierside at Naval Station Newport in support of the Chief of Naval Operations' 21st International Seapower Symposium (ISS) at U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

 
Rate This Plan: click on 1, 2 or 3 thumbs for your rating

Voting is easy.

  • 1 thumb   up: needs work, doesn't ring the bell
  • 2 thumbs up: good work, worth thinking about
  • 3 thumbs up: outstanding, deserves implementation

Play the game, change the game!

Photo credit: 140915-N-PX557-003 NEWPORT, R.I. (Sept. 15, 2014) Tugboats assigned to Naval Station Newport assist the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), homeported in Norfolk, Va., as she prepares to moor pierside at Naval Station Newport in support of the Chief of Naval Operations' 21st International Seapower Symposium (ISS) at U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist James E. Foehl/Released)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Neck 'n Neck

Good news:  dd Data Dilemma MMOWGLI game is open through Monday evening.  Looks like we've got a race, folks! As the leaderboard stands now, players NG36B and Rodent are neck 'n neck for the #1 spot with NG36B still holding the top of the Exploration Points board for Idea Card play.

In terms of Innovation Points for Action Plans, Rodent has surpassed NG36B.  Don't give up yet, though!  You still have a chance, there are a lot of winners in this game. So, get in play some cards and contribute to some action plans!

Top 10 Reasons Why You Need to Contribute to Action Plans

Top 10 Reasons Why You Need to Contribute to Action Plans!

Here we go, team. A is for Action Plan!Hey players,  Are you missing an opportunity to take this game and your ideas to the next level?  Well if you haven't been playing in the Action Plans, then the answer is YES!  

10) Your perspective is needed! You might not be an expert, but this is about the Power of the Collective- Innovation comes from the fringe!

  9) Maybe these players are asking the wrong questions- missing the boat- barking up the wrong tree?! It's your change to right the boat and climb the tree!

  8) You were born to be a leader! This is a great place for introverts to LEAD! Put your thinking into the plans that will lead the change!

  7) Get recognized! The Sponsor will be announcing game winners! You could get a letter celebrating your contribution!

  6) It's easy - look at the earlier blog post on how to join an action plan - It's just a click away.

  5) Practice collaboration skills! Action plans are a great venue to expand the conversation with other players and come up with even better ways to craft a final action plan!

  4) Earn innovation points! Authoring Action plans is a great way to score points!

  3) You don't even have to help author a plan to contribute - You can simply comment on plans or cast a vote for the plans you think should be implemented! The power of the thumbs up!

  2) Contributing to action plans elevates your status as a thought leader and may get you invited to future games!

... and (drum roll please!)

  1) You - yes YOU are part of a community doing something to making it better!! You will receive the gratitude of generations to come - while it might not be direct... ok, it might be very difficult to detect on many days, but you will know that You Came - you Played the Game and now the Game is changing - because of YOU!

Game Plan for Data Dilemma Week 2

Game Plan for Data Dilemma Week 2

Thanks players for the excellent efforts.  Play continues, there is still a lot to say!

Primary goal for this week: create and finish all Action Plans so that all players can vote on which might best work.

If you see good ideas emerging in the game that deserve to be written up as a potential path forward, please send us an Action Plan Request.

Here is our game plan for the week, followed by details on our two remaining themes.

  •      Monday.  Theme: Trusting Data through Data-Centric Security
  •      Tuesday.  Theme: Future Data-Centric Implementations
  • Wednesday.  Finish Action Plans, final "top-level free play" Idea Cards.
  •    Thursday.  Vote and comment on Action Plans. New participants welcome to vote.
  •         Friday.  Vote and comment on Action Plans, last call for all ideas.
  •      Monday.  Final day for straggler voting and comments, close game late in day. 

Trusting Data through Data-Centric Security

Trusting Data through Data-Centric Security

Data is simpler than software and a lot easier to check.  Data that is frequently used also tends be well defined. We ought to take advantage of those traits, in the large, across all of our information systems.  It is time to consider how Data Security might complement Software Security.  How does the Navy get beyond software barriers to reach the next level of capability: trust for shared data?

SHARE

  • Card 1876. Can we create data that is valid, signed, trusted, certified, accredited and secure at birth?
  • Card 1877. Can we use, re-use, adapt and “mash up” secure data throughout its lifetime and lifecycle?
  • Card 1878. Which open international standards are most important for data security and information assurance (IA)?
  • Card 1879. How can open standards best be assembled to establish a “security stack” for data?

SILO

  • Card 1880. Can we reduce code complexity and attackable surface within our software applications, by focusing on the full information assurance (IA) of the data they are producing and consuming?
  • Card 1882. How can the DON promote data visibility, accessibility, understandability, trustworthiness, and interoperability (VAUTI) for data at rest?
  • Card 1883. Can the same security techniques be used for data in motion, data at rest, and data in use - across multiple applications and also within the cloud?
  • Card 1884. How does the DON approach interfacing (e.g., machine-to-machine, human-to-machine) to keep data protected when moving from silo to system and back again?

Future Data-Centric implementations - Seed CardsFuture Data-Centric Implementations

Future goals for successful data usage are emerging, yet many challenges remain.  How do we _act_ now?  Many diverse efforts and activities have occurred over the past decade, but not all have successfully advanced the goals of the DOD Net-Centric Data Strategy of May 2003.  How can the Department of the Navy actively pursue a forward-facing data strategy that utilizes new capabilities?  What are good implementation approaches for success when programs and practitioners are facing the Data Dilemma?

SHARE

  • Card  1939. How do we collect and promote success stories of data/information sharing, sharing them widely to encourage further mashup adoption?
  • Card 1940. How do we address the cultural shift from concept of data ownership to data stewardship?  What factors prevented success in the past?
  • Card 1942. How can we best manage development, approval, publication and deployment of architecture products vital to support investment decisions?
  • Card 1944. How can the DON prioritize and balance the passive, active, and strategic publishing of its data so that it has the greatest impact?

SILO

  • Card 1946. How can the DON mitigate time and cost while effectively addressing our data challenges?
  • Card 1947. How can the DON best leverage new enterprise architecture technologies and products into a secure environment?
  • Card 1949. How can the DON effectively implement an architecture framework to guide and promote the integration and interoperability of new systems?
  • Card 1951. How can DON effectively use enterprise roadmaps to communicate influence factors (technology disruptors, threats, and risk) to stakeholders?

Looking forward to learning more, every voice matters.  Play the game, change the game!

Trusting Software and Trusting Data

Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) C&A graphic

Trusting Software and Trusting Data

Establishing total information assurance for computer programs is difficult.  Software certification & accreditation (C&A) is necessary and critically important, but it is also a costly and time-consuming process.  The Department of the Navy spends immense amounts of labor, funds, and personnel time to certify and accredit software.  Overhead includes significant “opportunity cost” of people who must live with tedious workarounds and reduced capabilities while waiting for new software programs to be approved.

For example, C&A prior to installing and running a new application on the Navy Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) has typically cost sponsoring commands many tens of thousands of dollars - and many months - to accomplish.  The actual work is highly specialized and often performed by contractors, adding further distance and overhead to the overall process.  Once complete (if successful), adding future enhancements and correcting bugs becomes similarly onerous, since follow-on codebase changes must also be carefully examined and tested in order to ensure that new vulnerabilities (either malicious or unintended) have not been introduced. 

History can be instructive – some lessons are timeless.  Here is one important lesson about the limits of software assurance that often seems to be forgotten.

The Turing Award is considered the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for computer science.  Since 1965 it has been awarded annually, with each recipient giving an eagerly anticipated talk describing their work.  The Turing Award Lectures are essential reading and show the evolving foundations of computer science.

Ken Thompson, Turing Award co-winnerIn 1983, Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson jointly received the Turing Award for their development of generic operating systems theory, and specifically for the implementation of the UNIX operating system. Ken Thompson’s lecture was Reflections on Trusting Trust, with the subtitle “To what extent should one trust a statement that a program is free of Trojan horses? Perhaps it is more important to trust the people who wrote the software.”  This talk can still surprise: he describes source code that looks like it does one thing, but actually performs things that are quite different.  Here are key excerpts, quoted from the original.

  • Stage I.  In college, before video games, we would amuse ourselves by posing programming exercises. One of the favorites was to write the shortest self-reproducing program. [...]
  • Stage II.  The C compiler is written in C. What I am about to describe is one of many "chicken and egg" problems that arise when compilers are written in their own language.  [...] shows a minimalist self-replicating code algorithm [...] This is a deep concept. It is as close to a "learning" program as I have seen. You simply tell it once, then you can use this self-referencing definition.
  • Figure 7, Reflections on Trusting TrustStage III.  [...] Figure 6 shows a simple modification to the compiler that will deliberately miscompile source whenever a particular pattern is matched. If this were not deliberate, it would be called a compiler "bug." Since it is deliberate, it should be called a "Trojan horse." [...]
  • The actual bug I planted in the compiler would match code in the UNIX "login" command. The replacement code would miscompile the login command so that it would accept either the intended encrypted password or a particular known password. Thus if this code were installed in binary and the binary were used to compile the login command, I could log into that system as any user.
  • Moral. The moral is obvious. You can't trust code that you did not totally create yourself. (Especially code from companies that employ people like me.) No amount of source-level verification or scrutiny will protect you from using untrusted code. In demonstrating the possibility of this kind of attack, I picked on the C compiler. I could have picked on any program-handling program such as an assembler, a loader, or even hardware microcode. As the level of program gets lower, these bugs will be harder and harder to detect. A well-installed microcode bug will be almost impossible to detect.

So in effect, Ken Thompson chose his Turing Award moment to reveal to the world that he had superuser and user access for every Unix system and server on the planet.  Further he revealed that, even with a great many people scrutinizing and rebuilding the source code, and even despite users banging on Unix daily everywhere, anyone else might use a super password for each and every account.  Meanwhile no one else knew that the super password existed, much less that it quietly insisted on re-propagating itself in each fresh new copy of Unix.  

No kidding.

What an amazing reveal.  I’ve always imagined that some people in the audience that day might not have waited for the end of the lecture, instead rushing out and calling back to their offices, sounding the alarm to shut down all computer access!  

These fundamental principles and constraints about software testing remain unchanged.  Therefore it is quite  reasonable for anyone today to understand that, at best, an extremely rigorous software certification and accreditation evaluation still has limits nevertheless.  Strictly speaking, even the best evaluators can only conclude “we didn’t notice or detect anything bad happening when we tested the codebase.”  Even more worrisome are accompanying disclaimers like “the accredited software is only considered secure when run in a secure operating environment, on secure hardware... at all times.”

Perhaps considering a data-centric point of view can help us.  Dialog in the Data Dilemma MMOWGLI game clearly shows that the Navy has great dependence – and even greater potential benefit – deriving from data that might be shared broadly.  Data sharing can occur both “outside” with public and partners, as well as “inside” among Navy stakeholder communities.  Might that data-centric point of view help to improve our information assurance in ways that are beyond the expressive power of software to guarantee?

Data is simpler than software and a lot easier to check.  Data that is frequently used also tends be well defined. We ought to take advantage of those traits, in the large, across all of our information systems.  It is time to consider how Data Security might complement Software Security.  

  • Can we create data that is valid, signed, trusted, certified, accredited and secure at birth?  
  • Can we use, re-use, adapt and “mash up” secure data throughout its lifetime and lifecycle?  
  • Can we reduce code complexity and attackable surface within our software applications, by focusing on the full information assurance (IA) of the data they are producing and consuming?
  • Can the same security techniques be used for data in motion, data at rest, and data in use - across multiple applications and also within the cloud?

A good check question for any broad concept is “assume success – then what?”  Let’s apply that test to this potential approach.  If data security can indeed be accomplished to properly complement software security, then here is one possible cybersecurity scenario:

  • Incident: applications in a networked enclave are 100% penetrated by malevolent intruders, who are later detected and locked out.
  •   Impact: no unauthorized access to information occurs because all data sets remain secure.

An Unsustainable Path by Maura SullivanData-centric security presents worthy challenges… that are beginning to appear feasible.  Open international standards provide major building blocks to work with.  Pieces of this puzzle are getting pushed around right now, with contributions by many thoughtful players in the Data Dilemma game.  Much more expertise is available to provide help on every question… if we can find the right paths forward.  Simply perpetuating the current status quo and maintaining an unchanging course down An Unsustainable Path doesn’t scale to meet our growing challenges.

Thirty two years have passed since Ken Thompson's revelation... I wonder whether anyone is calling back to headquarters yet.

How does the Navy get beyond software barriers to reach the next level of capability: trust for shared data

Whose data is it anyway?

Department of the Navy (DON) Chief Information Officer (CIO) logo, 2003

Whose data is it anyway?

The DOD Net Centric Data Strategy from 2003 says:

  • Ensure data are visible, available, and usable when needed and where needed to accelerate decision making.
  • Post all data to shared spaces to provide access to all users except when limited by security, policy or regulations.  

P-3 Orion aircraftYet many data sources end up in just one place, and are not designed to be shared.  Consider these examples:  

  • I started my naval career in the ASW community, flying P-3 Orion sub hunters.  We collected active and passive sonar data.  This data was recorded for replay purposes.  In many cases, special events were kept for posterity so that high-end analysts would review special signals of interest.  Wondering, did any of this data ever get  backto an ASW ship or submarine or their tactical operating centers?  
  • Today’s surface combatants receive data via a Navy Tactical Common Data Link.  MH-60R helicopters use this link to download four different types of combat systems data to ships.  My suspicions are that this data goes only to the ASW module aboard the carrier (CV).  Several more sites would benefit from these data within the strike group, such as CVIC, other ASW ships, and other MH-60R helicopters operating on the water. 
  • Latest Navy Drone to upgrade from XP to Windows 7Intelligence surveillance and reconnaisance (ISR) sensors routinely silo their data in faraway analysis centers.  I suspect there are times when this ISR information may be tactically applicable.  If it was easily sharable, that might be so.  

The Army and Navy are deeply involved in building tactical clouds.  The Air Force and Marines are considering their own.  Yet it appears that DOD and the services have not even started sharing data, as dictated by policy a dozen years ago.

How useful will a tactical cloud be if we have not even solved the problem of sharing relevant data?  Perhaps we should solve that problem first.

Mid-Game Progress Report -There Will Be Awards

Mid-Game Progress Report: There Will Be Awards!

Dear Data Dilemma MMOWGLI players,

Congratulations!  Over 200 players have done a great job working together to create a dozen Action Plans and over 1500 Idea Cards this week - the dialog is truly exciting. A lot of "aha moments" and practical paths forward are emerging.

We are keen to keep the momentum going. The primary focus for week 2 is to initiate more action plans, build on existing action plans, and have everyone vote for the ones they think are best. We'll also continue to explore additional themes (such as Creating Data that is Accredited At Birth and a possible Navy App Store) that you will find interesting. Please continue the great work in helping the DON adapt to the future in the Information Age.

MMOWGLI Achievement MedalPayback time... We want to recognize the effort that you have put into the game and the creativity that you have exhibited.  The authors for top action plans (chosen by the sponsor team and the players) will receive an opportunity to brief their plan (via video teleconference) to the Chief of Strategy & Innovation, Department of the Navy. In addition, top winners may receive a Letter of Appreciation from the Secretary of the Navy... stay tuned!

We plan on announcing these recognitions on Friday, April 24th.  We'll also highlight our most active card chains and some of the ideas that we thought were especially creative and helpful.  We'll continue to reach out to you again via email, Twitter @mmowgli and Twitter @DON_Innovation when results are available on the dd Data Dilemma blog.

More data from more people is always better.  So please feel free to invite your friends and colleagues to join in, we have another week to go.  It is clear that the Data Dilemma - Sharing versus Silo - affects many things.  Your work in this game has the potential to change many ways that the Navy does business.

Play the game, change the game!

Thinking about Data Strategy

 

Thinking about Data Strategy

After several days of gaming tactics we are now ready to wrestle with concepts relating to data strategy.   On its surface, a “data strategy” seems like a simple enough proposition: write a plan that describes your use of your data and manage to the plan.  Like physical assets, data has notions of size, shape and volume.  Also like physical assets, data can be conceptualized in terms of behavior and a lifecycle.  Engineers can model data, define bandwidth requirements for moving data, allocate storage for data-at-rest and use metadata to describe the behavior of data throughout its lifetime.  In essence, most organizations attempt to “build” an infrastructure for a data strategy and to manage data assets just like they manage physical assets.  This is why most data strategies fail. 

This phase of the Data Dilemma relates to the notion that a data asset is not a fixed entity that can be managed through its lifetime.  Strategic Data, or tactical data for that matter, relate to temporary conditions where the value of information is defined by its context.  This means the focus of a “strategy” has to be on dynamic decision making (i.e., the context) for the potential use of the data rather than simply on the management of the data representation itself.  If data was static and deterministic, we would not have a dilemma. 

For this part of the challenge it helps if you are not an engineer.  Sorry guys.  This exercise requires some fundamentally creative thinking about data as a continuously evolving organism within an information ecosystem.  You don’t own the organism or build the information ecosystem.  You have to co-exist within it, respect its complexity and try to use elements of it to your advantage.  You have to do this without destroying it or being destroyed by it.  You can manage your behaviors, create your decision criteria, and form your strategy, but you can’t expect the ecosystem or the organisms within it to completely comply with your will.  

In the DoD and emergency response professions we call this “readiness”.   Your challenge, if you decide to accept it, is to explore ideas about tools, analytical techniques and good common sense to design a decision infrastructure that derives value dynamically from a very rich, continuously changing information environment.

Biographical note:  Dan Green is a former naval intelligence officer, a Systems Engineer, and a Recovering Data Strategist.  A member of the Navy Data Sciences Directorate, he is also leading creation of the Joint Advanced Manufacturing Region (SW) SPAWAR, San Diego.

Navy Data Sciences Directorate
> Joint Advanced Manufacturing Region (SW) SPAWAR, San Diego

Day 4 Theme - Developing a Data Strategy

Day 4 Theme - Developing a Data Strategy

Navigational course check: our Data Dilemma Game Plan lists all themes for this week.  Today's focus is Data Strategy Development.

Coming up with great ideas is just the first step towards innovation becoming real.

  • How do we implement and execute together, breaking through old barriers blocking progress and putting new concepts into action?
  • What standards are relevant to ensure that Department of the Navy data is consistent, high quality, validatable, and interoperable?
  • What lessons learned do we need to consider? What are repeatable practices and metrics for success?

... play the game, change the game!

Day 4 Theme: Developing a Data Strategy

From Idea Cards to Action Plans

Hello players!  Thank you for your continued contributions so far this week.  As of now, we have generated over 1100 Idea Cards played and 6 Action Plans created!  Speaking of Action Plans...what are they?  How do you create one? Why are they important?

Action Plans are the who, what, why, when and where of one, single Idea Card.  An Action Plan is your opportunity as a player to tell us more about your idea.  In an Action Plan, you are not restricted to 140 characters or less.  In addition, you can even add images and video to enrich your plan. 

Action Plans are important because they are another way to win generate points!  Innovation Points begin to rack up when you create an Action Plan and/or contribute to them.  There are many ways to collaborate on an Action Plan without being an author.  For example, players can contribute their knowledge by adding to the Comments section of an Action Plan.  Players can also vote on the quality of the Action Plan.

Also, Action Plans with a red number need expertise! These are just a few of the ways you can contribute!

Know that you know what an Action Plan is how do you create one?  Simply select the Trouble Report link at the bottom of the game page.  Within the first paragraph, you'll see a link on how to create an Action Plan Request.  Fill out this form and your request will be answered shortly. 

In the end, collaboration on Action Plans is what MMOWGLI is all about.  Generating "knowledge accidents" and making them a concrete plan.  Thanks for your continued contributions.  Play the game, change the game!

Navy information sharing with the public – why?

Navy information sharing with the public – why?

In the best movie ever made, Caddyshack, the Scottish greens keeper tells Bill Murray, “Go kill all the goffers.”  Bill says, “If I do that, they will lock me up and throw away the key!”  (Of course, the Scot meant gophers).  That is how I felt about today’s topic, information sharing to the public.

America's Navy - A Global Force for GoodNaval operations are most often executed overseas, far away from the United States.  Why is the Navy interested in sharing any information with the public about these operations, I thought?  Naval operations are classified.  Not sharing data about yourself, your location, and your intentions is an operational virtue.   If I share classified operations, they will lock me up and throw away the key.

So Tuesday’s Open Data seed cards (452-459) made no sense.  Call me slow!  Then the light bulb came on.  The Navy interacts on issues of importance to the US public daily, often on very controversial topics.  Many of these topics are handled regionally, and the quality of the public interactions varies.  A lot!

For instance, currently the eastern shore region of Maryland is undergoing substantial growth in wind driven power, with giant windmills sprouting up everywhere.  One windmill project on the Chesapeake Bay in particular offers to nearly eliminate reliance on fossil fuels for electricity for that area.  Yet, these windmills also interfere with the most sophisticated stealth measuring system on the planet, a carefully instrumented range that the Navy has developed over fifty years.  Relocation of this range to another location, likely in the West, would cost billions. From a private sector point of view the windmills make perfect sense.  From a public sector point of view, the overall value is negated by an added tax burden to the taxpayers.  
  
USCGC MAUI rescues 5 Iranian marinersThese issues repeat themselves all over the United States and in foreign countries that host naval bases.  Information sharing might be a force multiplier here.

For example, there has been a long-running struggle between the Navy’s use of active sonar and marine mammal activists.  Transparency on the Navy’s side can often position the Navy to show reasonable people that they are doing everything they can to balance tactical necessity with consideration for marine mammals.

Another example: the Navy has quietly evolved a Green Fleet yet receives little credit. Perhaps improved information sharing here might not just benefit Navy public relations, but more importantly, share some of the breakthroughs of technology and policy that the Navy has pioneered in renewable energy and appropriate waste disposal.  Many Americans still think of the Navy’s properties as contaminated superfund sites.  While that may have been the case decades ago, it is not true today.

Jefferson said, “Whenever the people are well informed, they can be trusted with their own government.” 

So what are the best ways for the Navy to share their data that maximizes public benefit?

Day 3 Theme - Maximizing Mission Success with Data

Day 3 Theme - Maximizing Mission Success with Data

Navigational course check: our Data Dilemma Game Plan lists all themes for this week.  Today's focus is Maximizing Mission Success with Data.

Naval forces do not work in isolation. The Navy is a global force for good that includes hundreds of thousands of people working around the clock, at sea and ashore, working together with other branches of government, the public, and even other nations.

  • Does the Department of the Navy provide our people the greatest possible advantage from our data?
  • Can “lessons learned” from open data sharing help improve sharing among operating forces as well?

 ... play the game, change the game!

Day 3 Seed Cards

CHIPS Article on Open Data Fueling Innovation

CHIPS, the Department of the Navy's Technology Innovation MagazineOpen Data Fueling Innovation

CHIPS, the Department of the Navy's Technology Innovation Magazine

By Philip Lee, U.S. Marine Corps Maj. A.J. Martinez and Robert P. Kozloski, January-March 2015.

“Open data means taking data that is sitting in the vaults of the government, that the taxpayers have already paid for, and jujitsu-ing into the public domain as machine-readable fuel for entrepreneurship and innovation.” - Todd Park, former U.S. Chief Technology Officer

History has shown that innovation often occurs by accident. Information about one topic is joined with information about a seemingly unrelated topic and an unanticipated result occurs. Information sharing and providing access to data fuels innovation. Federal, state and local governments own a treasure trove of data and the aim of the President’s Open Data Initiative is to give it back to American taxpayers.

... Read more online at CHIPS magazine.

Data.gov graphic

 

Data Dilemma Game Plan

direction and speed

Data Dilemma Game Plan

Welcome players to the dd Data Dilemma MMOWGLI game.  We are off to a great start!

Our seed cards are organized around different themes each day this week.  We want to learn what you think, and encourage "forward thinkers" to go all the way towards creating new Action Plans.

Each set of Idea Cards examines the Data Dilemma closely:

  • SHARE:  How can data sharing strengthen/weaken the DON?
  •     SILO:  How can data siloing strengthen/weaken the DON?

We are planning our work and working our plan.  Here are the daily themes in detail.

Monday: Emerging Technology and Ever-Increasing Data

Despite ever-increasing technical capabilities producing vast flows of information, the overall design of how the Department of the Navy shares data has only progressed in a piecemeal fashion. How can we put technology to work on a broader scale, allowing data-centric approaches to work across all of our many systems? What data can be shared publicly and across the services? What data needs to remain silo-ed and separate?

SHARE

  • How can data sharing strengthen or weaken Department of the Navy?Card 22. What emerging technology can help the DON cope with the exponential growth of structured and unstructured data?
  • Idea Card 23. When does an attack on DON data merit a kinetic response?
  • Idea Card 24. How can the DON promote a device and application agnostic organization? 
  • Idea Card 25. How can the DON integrate sensor technology into their processes and procedures in order to reduce the reliance on the human factor?

SILO

  • How can data silo-ing strengthen or weaken Department of the Navy?Card 26. How can the DON identify and leverage the opportunities data analytics presents to strengthen cybersecurity?
  • Idea Card 27. How can the DON focus on controlling intellectual property (IP) instead of the applications/systems where the IP resides?
  • Idea Card 28. How can the DON ensure its data is appropriately safeguarded for privacy, confidentiality, and security risks?
  • Idea Card 30.  How can the DON ensure data/information remains the lowest possible classification system?
  • Idea Card 31.  How can the DON transform its data from disconnected files into standardized, machine-readable data?

Tuesday: Open Data

History has shown that innovation often occurs by accident. Information about one topic is joined with information about a seemingly unrelated topic and an unanticipated result occurs. Clearly information sharing and dependable access to data fuels innovation and “knowledge accidents.” How can we mash up the full range of our available information, achieving new levels of understanding and analysis using Open Data in the DON?

Open Data exampleSHARE

  • Card 452. What are the benefits in making unclassified DON data publically-releasable and open by default to the public?
  • Idea Card 453. How can the DON measure the effectiveness of an open data culture in their organization?
  • Idea Card 454. How can the DON balance quality vs. quantity of data so that their publically available data continues to demonstrate value?
  • Idea Card 455. What potential services/ applications can be created if more DON data is made publically available?
  • Idea Card 456. How can the DON better utilize their public data together with publically available (non-DON) data?

SILO

  • Idea Card 457. What risks does the DON incur by opening up its data to the public?
  • Idea Card 458. How can the DON manage its data to prevent unwanted access?
  • Idea Card 459. What DON data should be publicly available that currently isn’t?

Wednesday: Maximizing Mission Success with Data

Naval forces do not work in isolation. The Navy is a global force for good that includes hundreds of thousands of people working around the clock, at sea and ashore, working together with other branches of government, the public, and even other nations. Does the Department of the Navy provide our people the greatest possible advantage from our data? Can “lessons learned” from open data sharing help improve sharing among operating forces as well?

MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft on USS BONHOMME RICHARDSHARE

  • Idea Card 989. What are the benefits for improving data/information sharing within the DON?
  • Idea Card 991. What are the barriers to sharing data and information within the DON? How can we overcome these barriers?
  • Idea Card 992. How can the DON develop risk criteria that promote data/information sharing?
  • Idea Card 993. How can the DON use data analytics and visualization tools to help drive decisions?
 

A soldier with Operational Detachment Alpha 1215, 1st Special Forces Group, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, runs off the back of a CH-47F Chinook helicopter while conducting a simulated combat dive mission in the water off of Marine Corps Training Area Bellows, March 16, 2015. SILO

  • Idea Card 994. How can the DON increase the visibility and awareness of sensitive/classified content without exposing the sensitive/classified components? 
  • Idea Card 996. How can the DON change the culture of over-classification (including FOUO)?
  • Idea Card 997. How can the DON quickly discover and mitigate data leaks?
  • Idea Card 999. How can the DON shift the liability for data leaks away from the individual, provided they appropriately act as a data steward?

Thursday: Data Strategy Development

Coming up with great ideas is just the first step towards innovation becoming real. How do we implement and execute together, breaking through old barriers blocking progress and putting new concepts into action? What standards are relevant to ensure that Department of the Navy data is consistent, high quality, validatable, and interoperable? What lessons learned do we need to consider? What are repeatable practices and metrics for success? 

SHARE

  • Idea Card 1297. How can the DON implement effective data/content governance within the DON?
  • Idea Card 1298. What priorities should be in a DON data strategy?
  • Idea Card 1299. How does the DON move from a system-centric funding model to a data-centric approach?
  • Idea Card 1300. How can the DON assess the impacts of implementing an effective data strategy?
 

SILO

  • Idea Card 1301. How can the DON reduce the attack surface of disparate networks?
  • Idea Card 1302. Data accuracy, data relevancy, and data security are essential. What are other essential DON data needs and why? What can happen if a data need is overlooked?
  • Idea Card 1303. What are future potential data challenges the DON should consider and prepare for?
  • Idea Card 1304. What are struggles that the DON may face while evolving within the quickly changing IT environment?

Friday: Free play!

Here is your chance to steer innovation for everyone considering the Data Dilemma challenges.

  • Players can create top-level seed cards, initiating whole new categories of inquiry.
  • What big-picture challenges did we miss?  
  • Sound off!  React to other players!  We are interested in new topics that matter to you. 

Tough questions - and vitally important to all of us.  This is another excellent chance for you to contribute.  Play the game, change the game!

 

From control in a closed system to credible influence in an open system: Does EVERYTHING need to be secret?

"National Strategic Narrative Cover" by Source. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:National_Strategic_Narrative_Cover.jpg#/media/File:National_Strategic_Narrative_Cover.jpg
“The 21st century is an open system, in which unpredictable external events/phenomena are constantly disturbing and disrupting the system. In this world control is impossible; the best we can do is to build credible influence – the ability to shape and guide global trends in the direction that serves our values and interests (prosperity and security) within an interdependent strategic ecosystem. ” Anne Marie Slaughter, in foreward to A New National Strategic Narrative by Mr. Y.

The allied powers won World War II, aided in many cases by secret projects like Ultra, that kept secret the fact that the allies had broken the German code. But what happens when governments and large organizations, voluntarily or involuntarily, no longer can control who has access what information? Can a culture of “siloing” and perceived secrecy inhibit innovation? Is it possible to be too secret? Ultimately, siloing of much of our data today is actually impossible. In the past the military has won by hiding information and keeping it secret. If the interconnectedness of today’s open internet means that information is shared and distributed outside of our control, should we instead try to innovate, and win tomorrow’s conflicts, by sharing information instead?

What if we made public information that wasn’t actually classified as secret, but simply has never been released? Is it possible that some of the major challenges that our naval leadership discuss frequently, like encouraging innovation and revamping our personnel system, could be solved by crowdsourcing? Does everything really need to be hidden away from the public eye? The Department of the Navy (DON) collects more data each day than the total amount stored in the Library of Congress. Perhaps the only way to solve some of our biggest problems is to bring in the most problem solvers possible, and open up the data that we can to the broader Navy and the public.

History of the Navy in 100 ObjectsThis is a new way of thinking. Maybe it is correct. Maybe it isn’t. What is clear is that we need to ask the right questions, and think creatively about the 21st century information environment. We need your help.

Author: Christopher O'Keefe

LTJG O’Keefe is the producer and director of the series “A History of the Navy in 100 Objects.”  He is an intelligence officer currently stationed at the Pentagon.

An Unsustainable Path

Sharing versus Silo?

An Unsustainable Path

"Someday, on the corporate balance sheet, there will be an entry which reads, 'Information'; for in most cases, the information is more valuable than the hardware which processes it."  - Rear Admiral Grace Hopper 

U.S. Navy Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Jana Stanley, right, explains the functions of a long range thermal video camera to Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Sandie Banuelos July 20, 2011, aboard the dry cargo ship USNS Del Monte (T-AK 5049) at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story in Virginia Beach, Va., during the Trident Warrior 2011 experiment. Trident Warrior is an annual event that temporarily deploys advanced capabilities on ships to collect real world performance data and feedback from fleet users during an underway experimentation period.The Department of the Navy (DON) collects more data each day than the total amount stored in the Library of Congress, yet it is organized and funded around systems and hardware without regards to the data contained within. The DON builds and uses some of the most advanced sensor technology available, yet they are used as extensions of an individual’s capability rather than as a component of a data-centric infrastructure with the power to inform real-time decision-making and with humans in loop only when required. In our personal lives we live in a mobile world where 20,000 new apps a month are added to the app store, yet when we come to work we average 0.5 mobile devices, including laptops, per DON employee. For the lucky 5% of the DON workforce, who do have access to a smart phone at work there are 15 apps approved for use with DoD information.

The first principles upon which the DON information ecosystem is built were designed for the industrial age, the premise that systematically reducing vulnerabilities increases security. A system or network is only as valuable as the information contained within, which means the risk is directly proportional to the importance and usefulness. There is no such thing as a zero-risk environment, so the governing philosophy must be optimized for detection and speed of evolution, rather than vulnerability reduction.

05/08/2011 - U.S. Sailors assigned to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 1 disseminate satellite weather data from the meteorological center aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) while the ship is under way in the Pacific Ocean May 8, 2011.

DON platforms, the ships, submarines, and airplanes, are increasingly becoming software-centric. From advanced navigation and sensors to autonomous systems the capabilities of the future are increasingly tied to their ability to process and protect information. This is difficult in the private sector, but when we consider the needs of a 900,000 person organization, whose mission it is to operate in a distributed fashion using highly sensitive information in some of the most remote places on earth, including the middle of the ocean, the arctic, and undersea the challenge is that much more complex.

Over the course of the next couple of weeks we are hoping you can help us figure out how to get off the unsustainable path the DON is currently on and become a data-centric organization ready to unlock a future enabled by information.

Federal News Radio on Data Dilemma game

Federal News Radio .com

Federal News Radio: In Depth with Francis Rose interviews Don Brutzman on the Data Dilemma game. The Navy is trying an innovative way to find innovative solutions. It's inviting smart people that know computers to sign up for an online game. It's an open- source wargame where contestants can change both how the Navy and the game work. Don Brutzman is associate professor of the Naval Postgraduate School. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he shared details on how to play the Massive Multiplayer Online Wargame.

Data Dilemma (dd) Share vs. Silo Launch Announcement

Beyond Certification & Authentication (C&A): A Data-Centric Approach for DON's Future by Dr. Maura Sullivan

Data Dilemma (dd) Share vs. Silo Launch Announcement

Public Announcement: on 6-17 April 2015, we're challenging you to determine how the Department of the Navy should use Data to drive mission success, fuel innovation, and adapt to the future.

The initial round of the Data Dilemma (dd) mmowgli  game will explore Navy opportunities and challenges facing every Sailor and every Navy civilian every day. How can data sharing strengthen/weaken the DON? How can data siloing strengthen/weaken the DON? Many complex issues are involved and interrelated.

How will you help the Department of the Navy adapt to the future in the Information Age?

Dr. Maura Sullivan's session's title is "Beyond C&A: A Data-Centric Approach for the DON's Future."  Held 15-1600 Tuesday 10 February 2015 at the Department of the Navy (DoN) Information Technology (IT) Conference.  Software certification and accreditation (C&A) by itself is not enough to keep up with rapidly evolving data growth and data needs.

Abstract: this session looks at the current access-centric approach to IT and discusses how a data-centric view can allow for a device and application agnostic environment that can respond more quickly to rapidly changing IT trends. The session features a preview of Data Dilemma, a MMOWGLI (Massive Multiplayer Online War Game Leveraging the Internet) game sponsored by DUSN(M) and NPS launching in April.

More to follow.  Sign Up to Participate now!

 

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